Professor of European Studies in the University of Oxford, Isaiah Berlin Professorial Fellow at St Antony’s College, Oxford, and a Senior Fellow at the Hoover Institution, Stanford University. He is the author of nine books of political writing or ‘history of the present’ which have charted the transformation of Europe over the last thirty years. His essays appear regularly in the New York Review of Books and he writes a weekly column in the Guardian which is widely syndicated in Europe, Asia and the Americas.
His books include The Polish Revolution: Solidarity (1983); The Uses of Adversity: Essays on the Fate of Central Europe (1989); We the People: The Revolution of ’89 witnessed in Warsaw, Budapest, Berlin and Prague (1990); In Europe’s Name: Germany and the Divided Continent (1993); The File: A Personal History (1997); History of the Present: Essays, Sketches and Despatches from Europe in the 1990s (1997), Free World: Why a crisis of the West reveals the opportunity of our time (2004) and, most recently, Facts are Subversive: Political Writing from a Decade Without a Name (2009).

He has received many honours for his writings including the Prix Européen de l’Essai, the George Orwell Prize and honorary doctorates from the University of St Andrew’s, Sheffield Hallam University, and the University of Leuven.  In 2005, he featured on Time Magazine’s list of the world’s most influential people.